The Wonky Weaving Project

This has been so exciting and I love projects that emerge and develop as they grow.  We are working in Maybole, South West Scotland.  I was asked to do a weaving project to celebrate the town’s 500th anniversary as a Borough.

The weaving on one of the eight rigid heddle looms

The organisers were enthusiastic about the idea of a weaving project because this like many, was a weaving town. They wove Ayrshire blankets here and there were also many home weavers if you go further back.

But get this: the weaving riots in Maybole were just about the worst anywhere. Far more so than the oft talked about Paisley riots.  The riots were about mechanisation and factories destroying the livelihoods of home weavers. Difficult times.

So the group involved in this project  wanted to learn to weave, create  a wall hanging and learn a tiny bit of history at the same time.  And they have been amazing.  Only two had ever woven before.  They range in ages from 14 to 80-something and only a couple really knew each other. Weaving has brought them together.

The weaving is all done and now needs to be put together.  We did it on ‘rigid heddle’ looms but pretty much any loom will do, including a frame loom like our very economical Create With Fibre midi frame looms of course.

I call it ‘tapestry type’ weaving. It is not true tapestry, you can see the warp in places especially when we add those lovely bits of curly fleece.  Far easier and faster too.  We created slopes, curves  and texture and somehow the eye sees a landscape. And ‘wonky’ because of all those curves and wonky bits of course!

The finished weaving will now be backed and hung

We will add tiny needle felted sheep and boots now. Boots because Maybole was a boot making town too.

Weave, weave, weave…

Right now, weaving is the new black.  So many people want to learn.   So here is a spot of advice: don’t buy the largest loom you can find, thinking it will ‘do you’ for longer and save you buying another. 90% odds that not only will you have no dining room any longer (unless you have dinner round it) you will also rarely if ever warp it up ready to weave.  It is too daunting.  And my take on it is this: you can weave pretty much anything on a ‘rigid heddle’ loom.

A folding Rigid Heddle Loom

It will fit in a cupboard. You can sit in a chair and weave with it propped up on a windowsill, they are designed like that,  and simply weave panels if you want something wider.

The range of patterns that can be done is awesome.  Check out The Weavers Idea book by Jane Patrick.  It and other books especially for rigid heddle weaving are what you need.  Sarah Howard wrote a lovely book called ‘Wear Your Weaving’ which shows how to create garments using narrow panels.  

And if you just want to have a go, you can even weave around a cardboard box.  We have a FREE e-course ‘5 days to become a weaver’ which shows you how.   Check it out here and get our free e-zine at the same time.   Https://createwithfibre.co.uk

Hubby has been making our newest products, the ‘Dinky Loom’ and Midi Loom.  They enable you to do the simplest of weaving with tiny scraps of leftover yarn. I am making squares for a woven jacket.

Squares woven on the Dinky Loom

They are so quick to do and portable enough to take anywhere.

The dinky loom in action