Knitting the Enchanted Mesa

The Enchanted Mesa is a knitting pattern by designer Stephen West. And over at the Create With Fibre Community on Facebook, we decided to have an Enchanted Mesa Knitalong after Beata showed us her lovely creation.
It is surprisingly easy to knit, with just enough interesting stuff going on to make it also great fun. The ‘interesting stuff’ in this case is the fact that the shaping is done entirely by knitting short rows, hence the wonky shape. Don’t be fooled by the strange sleeves, it is very comfy to wear too.
This was a stashbusing project. My stash is enchanted too, actually. It is all handspun and mostly bits and bobs. And despite several stashbusting projects, the pile of yarn is not getting any smaller! So far the tally is:
six handwoven cushions
a knitted mini skirt
Dinky loom squares that will eventually make a jacket. Total so far about 30 squares
a half finished shawl

It is only one largeish bag of yarn, how can it not be smaller?!
Anyhow, Mesa here are the yarns chosen for the Mesa

yarns chosen for the Mesa

A few more were added enroute and black shetland/alpaca, spun and now used in several projects was chosen to separate the colours.  But not one single ball of yarn was completely used up in this project.  And hardly  any in the other projects either.  See what I mean, enchanted stash!

The neck is done first, then the short rows begin.

The neck and first part of the shoulders are knitted in merino and silk, spun from commercial roving, with the black  in between as above.  The fun started when I let go of worrying about how the colours would work out.  If you have selected them before hand, it just seems to work and I make a lot of things this way.

portable knitting!

this is easy to knit in groups or when out and about, as once you get the hang of the short rows you don’t need to think too hard.  It went with us on the train to Carlisle at Christmas and I picked this book up in a charity shop.  Great holiday!  The shiny part is random stuff spun for demo purposes when I taught some of our many courses.  That is why I end up with such a random stash.  And maybe why quantity doesn’t reduce.  Hmmm…  The multicoloured stuff is Icelandic roving, spun then dyed.  The stuff you get as a ‘wheel’ and are supposed to knit with.  Far better if spun first.

the body is taking shape

you can see how it now goes down one side more than the other.  You catch up with the other side later.  More leftover yarns from spinning courses and retreats… The black in between worked well to give the colours definition.

the Mesa is easy to try on as you go

It is rather like a shawl jumper combo, this.

This was a quick knit and great fun.  It is also comfy and easy to wear.  Success!

A Special Retreat and Some Sheep

Ryeland Sheep & Fleece
Ryelands are one of the oldest British sheep breeds and have been in the UK for hundreds of years.  Their legs are covered in fleece as well as their bodies, which along with their cute noses, gives them the distinctive ‘teddy’ appearance.  They are great mothers, good for both fleece and meat and rarely suffer from foot problems.  They can have either coloured or white fleece.  Wow!
The wool is great for spinning or needle felt.  it has a rather unique ‘crispy feel to it without being at all scratchy and will not pill or felt easily when made into knitwear.

One of Jacqueline Bonner’s Ryeland sheep

The Best Wool for the Job

I think that imported Merino is over rated as a spinning fibre, although its availability in as coloured tops makes it a good choice for UK based feltmakers who do not want to work specifically with indigenous fleece.   If you live in a country that produces it in larger quantities such as Australia or New Zealand, it is a good choice for you of course.    And there are breeders this side of the Pond of UK version of the breed, called Bowmont.  Although Merino type wool is soft it is prone to felting, hence its popularity with felt makers.  it is lovely for babywear if the parents don’t mind handwashing.  But Ryeland is a good all rounder and I love its ancient roots as a breed.

An Exciting New Retreat for Textile businesses

Janet has launched her very first Retreat specifically for those with a yarn, fibre or fibre animal business.  She has provided 1-1 mentoring for many years and this is something she is really excited about.   The Retreat will take place at the same amazing venue as the Create With Fibre knitting and spinning retreats.  So the views, food, wine, woodburning stove and time to spin, knit or crochet will all be there.  At the same time, we will talk about the business dilemmas and plans we have.  There will be 1-1 time with Janet and also a chance to actually get down to the nitty gritty and do some work on those plans.  Together we are stronger!